Art activities, Greetings!, Happenings, Make, Create, & Share!, student artwork

What’s up in the art room? (April 2022)

Check out some of our current projects happening in the art room and how they’re made!

Check out some of what we’ve been up to below!

This month students are still working on their still life acrylic paintings! They have all been taking a lot of time and doing their best work on these still life paintings and I’m excited to see how they come out! We first learned about composition and arranging a still life, completing several thumbnail sketches of inanimate objects arranged in different ways. Students had the chance to arrange objects and form their own set-ups. The decided arrangement was then sketched out onto a canvas. Before painting we talked about the color wheel and making our own colors as well as exploring tints, tones, & shades & undertones!

This month was also full of classes! Some fun projects at the Seaford Library, the Art League in OC, Roaring Point Campground, & a special paint party at Westside Community Center!

One of my favorite Easter traditions is forcing loved ones to make Ukranian Easter Eggs (I think they really like it) – the cat was at least happy to join in. It’s a time-consuming method, using wax resist – the results are always cool!

Also preparing for some upcoming art events with painted wine glasses and polymer clay bookmarks! Check out Music & Arts @ Pemberton Park! Fridays in May to purchase!

We also took a little break from painting still life in classes to create an Easter project – Decoupaged Eggs!

Check out these projects you can do at home!

Art, Happenings, Make, Create, & Share!, student artwork

Student Spotlight! (April 2022)

Each month I will be spotlighting one of my students – past or present, and their artistic ventures! I work with students of all ages and abilities and you’ll get to learn a little bit about these amazing artists and their work!

Our April spotlight is on:

Ian Golightly

I am Ian Golightly and I am 11 years old. I have been taking homeschool art classes with Miss Jenell for over four years. I especially like her cat, Tux who joins us in the studio!

Why did you begin to take art lessons/how did you become interested in art? I decided to take art lessons when I was looking for a new hobby. I have always liked creating and building things – from Legos to model vehicles and customizing toy trucks.

Is there anything else about you that you’d like us to know? When I am not working on art, I enjoy playing soccer, bike riding, taking long walks with my dad, reading with my mom, swimming, roller skating, and being with my friends. My absolute favorite food is French fries and spicy foods like hot sauce!

“Reuben” Acrylic on Canvas

What is your favorite thing you’ve ever created and why? “My proudest piece of artwork is an early acrylic painting I made of my cat Reuben. One of his preferred places to lounge was on top of our highest kitchen cabinets!”

“A Day in the Life of a Leaf” Acrylic on a leaf

Do you have a favorite color? I use blue in almost all of my art since it is my favorite color.

What is your favorite thing about art? “Watercolor pencils are my newest favorite medium along with acrylic paint and colored pencils. I am not a fan of pastels due to their appearance and tendency to smudge since I am left-handed.

Do you enter your artwork in any shows or contests? “Three of my piece of art have been on display at the Ward Museum.”

“Thumbs up” Watercolor pencil

How has your artwork improved/what have you done to keep improving as an artist? I hope to continue improving as an artist by taking more classes with Miss Jenell and Tux!

Ian is always open minded when he comes to class, he’s not afraid to try new mediums, techniques, or ideas! He’s focused on his art and is able to be critical of his own work, making adjustments until he reaches the desired outcome – all while with a positive & happy attitude! These attributes will, without a doubt, continue to help Ian grow as an artist! Keep up the nice work Ian!

Check out our other student spotlights here!

Art, Art activities, Craft, decorating, DIY, Easter Eggs, Holiday, Make, Create, & Share!

Decoupaged Eggs!

Create fun and colorful eggs this Easter with decoupage! Gather decorative tissue papers, glitter and some ribbon! These easy and fun eggs are a fun way to create a gift or decoration this Easter!

What you need:

  • Decorative tissue papers
  • ModPodge – I used Gloss
  • Glitter and/or Glitter glue
  • Paint brush
  • Eggs – I used real eggs that had been blown out. You can also use plastic dyeable eggs.
  • Pony beads or similar
  • Ribbon
  • Hot glue
  • Scissors
  • Hair dryer (optional)

Step one: Gather all your supplies!

Step two: Cut out pieces from your tissue paper – cut more than what you’ll think you will need and try to cut off as much of the background as possible. *If the tissue paper background is white, an your egg is white, then you don’t need to worry as much about getting rid of the background!

Step three: Brush the Modpodge on the egg in a thin layer (I did half the egg at a time), then add one of your tissue paper cut outs, brush another layer of Modpodge on top of the tissue paper. Carefully use your brush to flatten out the tissue paper and press down any wrinkles. The larger pieces of tissue paper you have, the more wrinkles you will end up with as it will have to curve around the egg shell!

Step four: Continue to add your tissue paper to your egg & layering Modpodge under and over each piece! Don’t be afraid to overlap pieces. Once your egg is complete, brush a layer of Modpodge on top of the whole thing, making sure all pieces are pressed down and sealed – I did half my egg at a time drying each half before Modpodging the second half! Let your egg dry completely – use the hair dryer to speed up the processs.

Step five: Apply glitter! The picture on the left is glitter glue in the center of the flowers and the photo on the right was brushed with Modpodge and covered with clear glitter! You could also add details with paint pens or Sharpies at this stage too!

Step six: You can leave your egg as it is or create a hanger with a piece of ribbon and a pony bead. Cut your length of ribbon, fold it in half, slide both cut ends of the ribbon in the bead (photo one), add some hot glue to the ribbon just below the bead, and slide the bead onto the hot glue. Let dry and then cut off any glue or ribbon below the bead. Add a drop of hot glue to the top of your egg and press the bead to it! While the hot glue is still wet you can sprinkle on some glitter!

Check out these fun eggs by students!

Looking for another Easter egg idea? Check out resist dyed Easter eggs and Marbled Easter eggs!

Art activities, Greetings!, Happenings, Make, Create, & Share!, student artwork

What’s up in the art room? (March 2022)

Check out some of our current projects happening in the art room and how they’re made!

Check out some of what we’ve been up to below!

This month students started working on a new project – still life acrylic paintings! We first learned about composition and arranging a still life, completing several thumbnail sketches of inanimate objects arranged in different ways. Students had the chance to arrange objects and form their own set-ups. The decided arrangement was then sketched out onto a canvas. Before painting we we talked about the color wheel and making our own colors as well as exploring tints, tones, & shades & undertones! I can’t wait to see all these completed still life paintings!

I was also able to hold a mini polymer clay succulent class at Westside Community Center, Felt flower plaques at Seaford library & painted pet portraits at Greenwood Library! And a partner program, Creative Science, Shrinking Turtles, at Westside Community Center too!

Also preparing for some upcoming art events with painted wine glasses and polymer clay hair pins! Check out Music & Arts @ Pemberton Park! Fridays in May to purchase!

This month I also worked on a commission – painting the top of table and chairs!

Students also finished up on color wheels and creating artwork using warm & cool colors to help create or evoke certain feelings, moods, or ideas into their art! Many focused on hands and how we can also use them to communicate with too! While others completed a painted gourd birdhouse and pet portrait!

Check out these projects you can do at home!

Art, Happenings, Make, Create, & Share!, student artwork

Student Spotlight! (March 2022)

Each month I will be spotlighting one of my students – past or present, and their artistic ventures! I work with students of all ages and abilities and you’ll get to learn a little bit about these amazing artists and their work!

Our March spotlight is on:

Syd Johnson

My name is Syd Johnson, I’m in 11th grade, and I’ve been taking art lessons for two years. I’ve always been interested in art and never really had the chance to make it to my best ability and never had enough supplies, so that’s why I started art lessons. My favorite type of art to make is assemblage but I really enjoy looking at watercolor paintings. My grandma really inspires me to make art because I always enjoy how happy it makes her when I show her something new I’ve made.

“Broken Hearts” – Colored Pencil on Paper, Keith Herring Inspired.

What artist(s) from history do you admire most and why? “My favorite artist is Keith Haring because he made a lot of art about what would be considered “sensitive/inappropriate” in the 80’s. I feel like that’s very brave, and his art is just awesome!”

Besides painting and drawing are you into any other art forms? “I like photography.”

“Eye See You” – Mixed Media Collage

Why do you think art is important? – Why is it important for you? “Art is important because it’s fun, it requires skill; not everyone can do it and it gets the creative juices flowing. Without creativity, life is dull and boring, art makes it fun and interesting.”

What is your favorite thing about creating art? “It’s fun to see the vision that you made in your head come to life.”

Do you plan to have a career in the arts? “Yes – but I’m not sure what specifically.”

“Recycled Seahorse” – Assemblage/Mixed Media on Wood

Do you enter your artwork in any shows or contests? “I have done some, but I plan to do more in the future.”

Do you have a favorite color? “Yes, pink.”

How long does it take you to complete your artwork? “It depends, it could be from a quick sketch for fun, to multiple weeks on one piece.”

“Oscar” – Acrylic on Wood

When you’re making your art do like to listen to music or watch tv for inspiration (if so what)? “I like to watch iCarly while I do stuff”

Is there a certain style, or type, of art that you’d like to someday try? “I’d like to try graffiti.”

Is there an aspect of art that you don’t like, and why? “I hate pretentious and arrogant people in the art community. I feel like they take away from the fun of making art, by turning it into more of a competition.”

“Mushroom” Printmaking, Carved Linoleum & Ink

Do you have any advice for someone who wants to become an artist or improve their skills? “Just practice and even if it doesn’t look good at first, keep trying.”

What do you think makes a good artist and/or piece of art? “Define “good” – what one person sees as good, could be awful to someone else.”

“Sun with Face” – Acrylic on Canvas

How has your artwork improved/what have you done to keep improving as an artist? “With every piece of art I make I learn more and become better.”

Syd enjoys the process of creating and making, she comes with ideas and works to bring them to life! She sets goals for her artwork and overcomes any challenges along the way – completing a piece once she reaches the desired outcome. Through her process she is also developing her own unique style and includes a lot of herself in her work! Keep up all the awesome work Syd, can’t wait to see your artistic future!

Check out our other student spotlights here!

Art, Art activities, Craft, DIY, Make, Create, & Share!

Polymer Clay Succulents!

Create cute & fun polymer clay succulents that you can turn into magnets, gift toppers, desktop decor, and more! The instructions show several different types of plants inspired by real succulents and how you can place them together in a tin to create a mini garden and turn it into a magnet – you could also use bottle caps, miniature terracotta pots, or more polymer clay, to create your own containers for your succulents or create the succulent by itself and turn them into jewelry, hair pins, etc. Get creative and create your own types of plants & gardens!

What you need:

  • Polymer Clay – I used primary colors (Yellow, Red, & Blue) to mix my own shades of greens, reds/purples, along with some white clay to make lighter greens/jades/teals. Additionally, I used terracotta colored clay for my ground – you could also mix brown with the primaries. I recommend SculpeyIII, a 2oz block of each color will be enough to make a few gardens in a similar size to mine.
  • Translucent Liquid Sculpey
  • E6000 or Quick Grip – or another strong glue to attach your magnet to your tin.
  • Strong Magnets – these need to be smaller than the container you plan to put you succulents in.
  • Tin or other container for your garden – I recommend something shallow like a bottle cap, small tin or miniature terracotta pot. The tins I used were 15ml.
  • Toothpick or skewer
  • Soft Pastel – in desired colors, I used pinks & reds.
  • Paint Brush – soft and relatively small.

Inspired by Baby Toes and Jade Gollum succulents!

Create both by starting with the same steps! Follow steps 1-7 to complete Baby Toes and then continue with steps 8-9 to turn them into Jade Gollum!

1. Roll a piece of clay into a snake approx. 1/16″-1/8″ thick.

2. & 3. Cut several pieces from your snake approx. 1/4″ long – these don’t need to be exact!

4. & 5. Roll one end of your cut pieces into a point.

6. & 7. Gather three pieces and gently press your pointed ends together in a bunch, continue to add remaining pieces in a radial fashion until you’ve reached your desired baby toes succulent size!

Turn your Baby Toes into Jade Gollum by using a toothpick to create a divot in the top of the succulent (photos 8). Lastly add pink pastel dust to the tops of your Jade Gollum (photo 9)!

Inspired by Zebra Haworthia, create this spiky succulent!

1. To make a darker green clay, mix a little bit of red with some green clay.

2. & 3. Roll your clay into approx. 1/8″ thick snake and pinch off several small pieces from the snake, approx. 1/2″ long.

4. Roll the ends of each piece you pinched off, to create points.

5. Gently flatten your piece between your fingers.

6 & 7. Gather three pieces and gently press your pointed ends together in a bunch at the bottom and allowing the tops to slightly fan out. Continue to add remaining pieces in a radial fashion until you’ve reached your desired Haworthia succulent size!

Inspired by Little Jewel succulents!

1. Roll 12 balls of clay in various sizes, with the largest not much bigger than a pea. 2. Roll your balls into a small snake, rolling on the ends to form points. 3. Pinch 3 of your smallest pieces together to form the center of your little jewel. 4. Gently flatten your remaining piece between your fingers. 5. & 6. Continue to add your pieces, smallest to largest, around your center, begin by adding three between each of your center pieces (photo 5), then adding three more between each of those pieces!

Inspired by Purpusorum!

1. & 2. Form several small flattened diamond shapes from the desired color in various sizes – no larger than your pinky nail. 3. Pinch 3 of your smallest diamond’s points together to form the center of your Purpusorum. 4. & 5. Continue to add your pieces, smallest to largest, around your center, begin by adding three between each of your center pieces (photo 4), then adding three more between each of those pieces! Continue to add pieces until you’ve reached your desired size!

Seedum comes in many shapes and forms, this little clay succulent was inspired by the Lime Zinger variety!

1. Make 4 sets of small clay balls in various sizes, for a total of 8 balls (two of each size), with the largest set about the size of a pea.

2. & 3. Gently flatten all of your balls into pancakes!

4. Starting to form the center of your Lime Zinger, take your two smallest pancakes, turn them into taco shells and slide them together as shown in picture 4.

5. Take your next size up pancakes and place them around your center piece so they are opposite of your center – don’t line them up the exact same way as your first two but cover the gap that was created.

6. With your next two pancakes, place them opposite of your last two – covering the new gaps created in the last step.

7. Continue to add your last set of pancakes on in this manner – you can also make your seedum larger by adding more pancakes!

1.Add terracotta colored clay to the inside of your tin – this doesn’t need to be all the way to the top, but near the top.

2. Use a toothpick to create texture!

3., 4. & 5. Use liquid sculpey to “glue” your succulents to the terracotta clay – ensure your plants are stuck well by blending some of the plant into the terracotta and visa versa.

6. & 7. Add color to some of your succulents with chalk pastel dust – scribble some pastel on a piece of paper and then use a soft brush to pick up the dust and apply to your succulent.

Bake your piece at 275*F for approx. 15min. – check on your piece several times during baking, if you notice any “scorching” on the tips of smaller succulents you may need to turn down the temp and cook longer (for example: 265* for 20 min.).

Once it’s baked and cooled, you can add a magnet or leave as is! I use E6000 to adhere the magnet to the tin – let sit for 24hrs before using!

Student succulent garden creations!

Join us at the Art League of Ocean City in June to create your own!

Art activities, Greetings!, Happenings, Make, Create, & Share!, student artwork

What’s up in the art room? (February 2022)

Check out some of our current projects happening in the art room and how they’re made!

Check out some of what we’ve been up to below!

This month students finished creating entries for the Ward Museum’s students art show – “No More Waste, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle”. Everyone brought in plastic bags from retail shops, grocery stores, and plastic bags that breads, potatoes, and other foods are packaged in. Using an iron, we fused layers of plastic together to create a thicker plastic, adding lettering, colors, and cut-outs (from more plastic) to make our works of art colorful and unique! Finally, we cut and assembled our plastic, fusing pieces together to turn it into heavier duty bags, pouches, cases, and artwork! Artwork will be on display through June 12th!

February was full of paint nights in Ocean City at the Princess Royale through the OC Art League. As well as some held at the Seaford & Greenwood Libraries!

This month I was able to complete my first pastel commission of the year – “Admiral”. As well as work on some new painted glass pieces that will be available at the Ward Museum’s gift shop and upcoming art events! I also created an entry for Tropical Moscato – Follow this link and vote by leaving a comment on your favorite entry!

Click here and leave a comment to vote for your favorite entry!

Students also worked on color wheels and creating artwork using warm & cool colors to help create or evoke certain feelings, moods, or ideas into their art! Many focused on hands and how we can also use them to communicate with too!

Check out these projects you can do at home!

Art, Happenings, Make, Create, & Share!, student artwork

Student Spotlight! (February 2022)

Each month I will be spotlighting one of my students – past or present, and their artistic ventures! I work with students of all ages and abilities and you’ll get to learn a little bit about these amazing artists and their work!

Our February spotlight is on:

Elijah Cockey

How long have you been taking art lessons? “I have been taking art lessons since 2012.”

Why did you begin to take art lessons/how did you become interested in art? “I began taking art lessons because, as a homeschooler, it is hard to find opportunities to do art.”

What or who inspires you to create your artwork? “Well, I have no muse, really, but (Ms. Jenell can back me up on this), I really like sharks and snakes, so I create a lot of art about them.”

What are your favorite mediums and/or subjects for your artwork? “My favorite medium I’ve used in class is probably acrylics. My favorite medium I’ve used outside of class is probably blacksmithing.”

Is there anything else about you that you’d like us to know? “One thing I’d like you all to know is that the word “Lego” comes from the Danish term “Leg Godt,” or “Play Well.” I thought that was interesting.”

“Santasaurus” Acrylic on Slate – “To avoid seeming off task while looking at stencils, I somehow had to incorporate dinosaurs into my artwork. It turned out almost as lit as the meteorite that brought santasauru’s career to an end.”

Besides visual arts are you into any other art forms? “I am certainly into other art forms. I like music a lot. I play cello, upright bass, electric bass, and banjo. I’m considering learning bagpipes, but that’s still a work in progress.”

Why do you think art is important? – Why is it important for you? “I think that art is important for numerous reasons, but I’ll focus specifically on art’s historic significance. Art—whether that be paintings, carvings, photography, sculpture, etc.—has proved to be a key component of our understanding of history. For example, when we come across a culture whose writing system is yet to be deciphered, or a culture who may not have had a written language, their art is often one of the sole windows into their world that we have. Even in recorded history, images of historical events can give contextual evidence for historical events. Art is important to me for the same reason.”

What is your favorite thing about art? “My favorite thing about art is the wide variety of artistic mediums there are.”

What artist(s) from history do you admire most and why? “The artist I admire most in history is Caravaggio. Though he is underappreciated, he influenced other artists.”

Do you plan to have a career in the arts? “I do. I plan on becoming a musician.”

“Impossible Shape” Acrylic on canvas – “If it’s impossible, then how did I draw it?”

Do you enter your artwork in any shows or contests? “Whenever an opportunity comes up, whether that be through art class or through another organization like 4-H, I always submit my art. Did I say I win? No. But I submit.”

Is there a certain style, or type, of art that you’d like to someday try? “I’ve always wanted to try glassblowing. I’ve seen people do it at Jamestown, the Corning Museum of Glass, and Salisbury University. It’s a mesmerizing process.”

Do you have a favorite color? “My favorite color is orange. I like campfires, leaves, pumpkins, and all other things related to fall, so orange seemed like a natural favorite color.”

How long does it take you to complete your artwork? “My artwork takes as long for me to complete as I will stop talking in art class. Fact.”

“Sharkuterie” Mixed Media on Board – “It’s a picture of a shark because I’m a great admirer of sharks.”

What is your favorite thing you’ve ever created and why? “My favorite thing I’ve ever created in art class is a shark on a board. Kind of like a…Sharkuterie board. I crack myself up.”

When you’re making your art do like to listen to music or watch tv for inspiration (if so what)? “I like listening to music while I do my homework. I find it helps me focus.”

Is there an aspect of art that you don’t like, and why? “One thing that I don’t like about art is the fact that stick figures are often looked down upon. That’s kind of offensive…if you’re a stick figure, of course.”

Do you have any advice for someone who wants to become an artist or improve their skills? “Yeah, go take from Ms. Jenell.”

What do you think makes a good artist and/or piece of art? “I think that a good artist has a point to make with their art, and I think good art makes that point. It doesn’t have to be a deep, metaphysical point. It just ha to be worth making.”

How has your artwork improved/what have you done to keep improving as an artist? “My artwork has much improved over the years. One skill I have developed in particular is the ability to look at a picture and draw from that picture.”

Elijah brings fun and humor to class every week – he enjoys making others laugh (as well as “cracking himself up”), his sense of humor reflected in his artwork; bringing a smile to the viewers. He also likes to think outside the box and add his own perspective or take on the given subjects, mediums, & styles, creating unique and personal pieces of art!

Check out our other student spotlights here!

Art, Art activities, card making, Craft, Holiday, Make, Create, & Share!, Painting, student artwork

Cool Hands & Warm Hearts

Have fun with warm and cool colors, creating simple & meaningful pieces of art that also make perfect Valentine’s Day cards!

What you need:

  • Watercolor Paints
  • Watercolor Paper x2 at least 8″x10″
  • Paint Brush
  • Masking Tape
  • Gluestick
  • Crayons
  • Course Sea Salt
  • Plastic Grocery Bag

What are warm and cool colors? Warm colors are reds, oranges and yellows, while cool colors are, blues, greens, & violets. Warm colors often make us think of warmth – fire, sunshine, heat. Cool colors tend to be more calming and make us think of water, sky, or ice. For this project we have three different elements: Your background paper, your hand, and your heart! We created a pattern by layering warm and cool colors for each element; Background in warm colors, hand in cool colors, heart in warm colors, or the reverse; background cool colors, hand warm colors, heart cool colors. Next to one another, warm and cool colors are very contrasting and make one another stand out! Decide if you would rather have a warm heart and cool hand or cool heart and warm hand!

Prepare your papers: You will need one piece of paper for your background and one piece to share for your hand and heart. Tape one piece of watercolor paper down to a work surface for your background with your masking tape. Cut the other piece of watercolor paper in two, trace an outline of your hand one piece, and draw a heart shape on the other (make sure your heart will fit in your hand outline). Tape your hand and heart pieces of watercolor paper to your work surface as well. Taping helps to keep your paintings flat while you work on them! Keep in mind the tape will resist the watercolor – try to apply the tape evenly around your background paper!

Listed below are three different watercolor techniques to make your warm and cool color hearts and hands! You can use any of the three of the techniques for any portion of your project – background, hand, & heart, or combine techniques or create your own! For each technique we will be using “wet on wet” – where we brush your paper with water, then add our paint. This helps our colors flow and mix around, giving us some really fun effects! Have your watercolors prepared and ready!

Crayons & Watercolor – Use warm or cool color crayons to draw designs or patterns on one of your elements (background, hand or heart). Brush water on your element, going over the crayon designs, then use watercolor paint to fill in your element – the crayons are waxy and will resist the watercolor!

Salt & Watercolor – Wet your element by brushing it with water, then dab splotches of watercolor on top! Watch as the paint flows and mixes on the paper! While the paint is still wet, sprinkle a little bit of salt on your element – notice how the paint pools around the pieces of salt! Let your element dry completely and then gently brush off the salt pieces to reveal the finished technique!

Plastic & Watercolor – This technique is made by using a plastic grocery bag – you may need to cut the bag open so it’s bigger and can cover your whole paper surface! Wet your paper with water and then add color to paper – in the example below we dabbed color on the paper but you can use almost any method for this technique! Once you have your whole piece of paper covered with color, and while it’s still wet, place your piece of plastic over the wet paint, pressing gently, and being sure to “scrunch” or “crinkle” the plastic on your paper. Let this dry completely (this can take some time!) and then remove the plastic to reveal a very cool technique!

Once you have all your elements painted, let them dry completely – it’s best not to use a hair dryer to speed up the process for the salt or plastic techniques as it may not allow the techniques to work well. When they’re dry and ready, remove the tape and cut out your hand and heart! Glue all of your elements together! Turn these into cards or pictures for Valentine’s day!

Change it up and make multiple hands – add something instead of hearts!

Art activities, Greetings!, Happenings, Make, Create, & Share!, student artwork

What’s up in the art room? (January 2022)

Check out some of our current projects happening in the art room and how they’re made!

Happy New Year! Check out some of what we’ve been up to below!

Tux was super excited to help us with our first project of the year; creating entries for the Ward Museum’s students art show! Students are creating a piece of upcycled artwork for the upcoming show “No More Waste, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle”. Everyone brought in plastic bags from retail shops, grocery stores, and plastic bags that breads, potatoes, and other foods are packaged in. Using an iron we fused layers of plastic together to create a thicker plastic, adding lettering, colors, and cut-outs (from more plastic) to make our works of art colorful and unique! Finally we cut and assembled our plastic, fusing pieces together to turn it into heavier duty bags, pouches, cases, and artwork!

This month I was able to visit Parkside High and create mini succulent gardens out of polymer clay with students there!

We were also able to hold a painted wine glass class at the Seaford Library!

I’ve had some time this month to work on a fun commission project – painting a wooden Noah’s Ark set! And have also been working on adding some new polymer clay bookmarks to my Etsy shop! Check out this post on how I create my “Put a Fork in it” bookmarks and see them all in my Etsy shop!

Check out these projects you can do at home!